Two-toed Sloth

Two-toed Sloth

Where in the world?

Tropical rain forests of South America.

 

Animal Facts:

Two-toed Sloths get their name from the two giant claws on their front paws that can grow as long as three inches and are perfect for climbing and hanging from trees.

Two-toed Sloths are solitary animals that spend most of their lives high up in the trees. They only venture to the ground to change trees, locate new food sources, or about once a week to go potty. Although they are nearly immobile on the ground, they are very competent swimmers.

The most common resting position for the sloth is curled up in the branches of a tree where they can resemble a termite nest or a knot in the wood. This, and the green color of their fur, provides great protection from predators.

Sloths are nocturnal, sleeping during the day and waking at night to eat berries, leaves, small twigs and fruits. They get water by lapping dew off of their food.

 

Did you know?

Two-toed sloths eat, sleep and even give birth upside down. Because of this posture, their internal organs have re-positioned over time and their hair is actually parted along their stomach and grows towards their back.

American Mini Pig

American Mini Pig

Where in the world?

Bred in the United States from pig and boar species from the Americas, Europe, and Asia.

 

Animal Facts:

The American Mini Pig was bred from a variety of pig breeds to attain its small stature and characteristic coloring.  The Minnesota Mini Pig was bred from a cross of Black Guinea Hogs, Feral Boars, the Piney Rooter, and the Ras-n-Lama pigs from Guam.  Eventually, the Minnesota Mini Pig was crossed with the Vietnamese Pot-bellied Pigs from Germany to attain the spotted appearance with the miniature pot-bellied body.

Adult mini pigs are around 15 to 20 inches from ground to the top of the shoulders.  Mini pigs have a friendly disposition and are very intelligent and trainable, making them a popular chose of pet for pig-lovers.

If you have called your dog a pig for eating too much, it would be an accurate description!  It’s rare for a pig to turn up its snout at food.  Pigs are opportunistic omnivores, eating anything from leaves, roots, and fruits to insects and fish.

Did you know?

Since the American Mini Pig is a label that covers any miniature pot-bellied pig, there are many nicknames.  Some of these nicknames include Teacup, Micro, Super Micro, Nano, Pixie, and Pocket Pig.

Capybara

Capybara

Where in the world?

Rivers, ponds, streams and lakes of northern South America.

 

Animal Facts:

Capybaras are the world’s largest rodent, weighing up to 165 pounds. Males and females look alike and they live 8 to 10 years in the wild.

They are most active during dawn and dusk, and eat grasses, aquatic plants and fruits.

Capybaras have 4-5 pups per litter. The young will ride on females’ backs while in the water and will begin grazing within a week of birth. They live in groups, with a dominant male, several females, subordinate males, and young.

Did you know?

Capybara’s eyes, nostrils, and ears are found on the tops of their heads, so the majority of their bodies can remain below the water surface. This allows capybaras to learn about their surroundings while remaining hidden underwater. They can also hold their breath for up to 5 minutes underwater – a useful skill for reaching food or avoiding predators.

Asian Small-clawed Otter

Asian Small-clawed Otter

Where in the world?

Southern India, southern China, Southeast Asia, Indonesia and the Philippines.

 

Animal Facts:

The Asian small-clawed otter is the smallest living otter species in the world.  Its claws do not extend beyond its webbed fingers and toes.  This allows it to use its paws instead of its mouth to catch and feed on mollusks, crabs and other small animals.

Their ears are small and round and have a unique valve-like structure that enables them to close when swimming underwater.  Their whiskers are extremely sensitive to underwater vibrations and play a major role in sensing the movements of prey.

These furry fellows are threatened by rapid habitat destruction, hunting, and pollution.  Their population is decreasing despite being a protected species.  Asian small-clawed otters are classified as vulnerable because they are likely to become endangered unless the circumstances that are threatening their survival and reproduction improve.

Did you know?

The Asian small-clawed otter’s tail is about one-third of its total body length and is used to both propel and steer itself while swimming and to help maintain balance when standing upright on its back legs.

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