Small Polyp Stony Coral

Small Polyp Stony Coral

Where in the world?

Throughout all of the world’s oceans.

 

Animal Facts:

Stony Corals are the architects of the reef structure. They have 6-fold symmetry as well as a calcium-based skeleton. 6-fold symmetry means the coral has six tentacles or tentacles in multiples of six.

The reef aquarium hobby long ago divided stony corals into two categories, Large Polyp Stony (LPS) and Small Polyp Stony (SPS). This antiquated view still serves as a guideline for care where SPS need more attention to detail than their LPS counterparts. SPS corals tend to demand very intense light, strong currents, and pristine water balance compared to the more adaptable LPS corals.

SPS Corals are the builders of calcium carbonate reef structures found in the wild. The skeleton of these corals is slowly secreted by the skin at the base of each coral polyp. Some SPS corals can grow very quickly while others can take seemingly forever to show any growth.

Did you know?

As with any rule, there are a multitude of exceptions. There can be a world of difference between two species of SPS coral when it comes to coral husbandry, so coral hobbyists must research which SPS corals can exist in the same tank conditions.

 

Colombian Shark Catfish

Colombian Shark Catfish

Where in the world?

Fresh and brackish waters in waters in North, Central, and South America, from Southern California to Peru to Peru on the Pacific Coast.

 

Animal Facts:

Colombian Shark Catfish have a high dorsal fun and long whiskers.  Their bodies are silver with a white belly and the fins are black, tipped with white.

They have three pairs of barbels; two on the lower chin area and one pair on the upper jaw, which are used to search for food in murky water.

Colombian Shark Catfish are omnivores eating a variety of plant material, aquatic invertebrates, and small fish.

Did you know?

Colombian Shark Catfish are also commonly called Jordan’s Catfish, West American Cat Shark, and White Tipped Shark.

 

Large Polyp Stony Coral

Large Polyp Stony Coral

Where in the world?

Throughout all the world’s oceans.

 

Animal Facts:

Large Polyp Stony Corals typically live in colonies and can be found on sea beds. They are called “stony” because they deposit calcium carbonate extracted from the seawater to build themselves a hard­cup shaped skeleton. They come in a wide variety of shapes and colors depending on the species, their location, and the amount of water movement in their habitat.

Each individual animal is known as a polyp. Most of the stony polyps have long stinging tentacles called ‘sweeper tentacles’ that surround their mouth and are armed with stinging cells called nematocysts that assist in both food capture as well as defense.

Large Polyp Stony Corals produce their young by “budding”. This means the parent will grow multiple smaller polyps over time that will eventually separate from the parent, forming a multi-polyp colony with a common skeleton. These can grow up to several feet in diameter or height.

Did you know?

The degree of extension of the polyp tentacles depends upon the amount of light they receive, the undersea current, and whether the coral is feeding or feels threatened.

 

Clown Knifefish

Clown Knifefish

Where in the world?

Lakes, swamps, and river backwaters of Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and Vietnam.

 

Animal Facts:

The Clown Knifefish, also known as Spotted Knifefish or Clown Featherback, is a nocturnal, tropical freshwater fish with a long, very distinct knife-like body that gives these fish their name. Adult Knifefish also have a row of black spots ringed with white. The size of these spots usually decreases as the fish grows.

This species grows to a fairly large size, up to a little more than 3 feet and can weigh up to 11 pounds in the wild.

They normally hunt live prey and will attempt to eat any fish that fits into their mouths.

Did you know?

Since these fish usually live in swamps or lakes with stagnant water and little oxygen, they can breathe air at the surface of the water to survive.

 

Neon Tetra

Neon Tetra

Where in the world?

Amazon Basin.

 

Animal Facts:

Known for their bright, electric looking colors, the Neon Tetra is a small freshwater fish. They have a light blue back over a silver body with a red streak.

Neon Tetras are found in the western and northern Amazon basin in southeastern Colombia, eastern Peru, and western Brazil.

As omnivores, Neon Tetras will eat a variety of algae, small invertebrates, and insect larvae.

On average, Neon Tetras reach 3.5 cm in length, making them a very small schooling fish.

Did you know?

Neon Tetras have a preference for acidic blackwater streams, but also occurs in transparent clearwater streams. However, they are not found in the whitewater rivers.

 

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