Argentine Red Tegu

Argentine Red Tegu

Where in the world?

Tropical rain forests, savannas, and semi-deserts of east and central South America.

 

Animal Facts:

The Argentine Tegu is the largest species of tegu lizard, with males sometimes reaching as long as 5 feet. A healthy tegu can live for 15 – 20 years in the wild, and possibly even longer when in captivity at zoos, aquariums and as pets.

Tegus will eat nearly anything they can fit in their mouth. Because they’re omnivores, their diet may include plants, fruit, invertebrates, rodents, birds and fish.

Like many other cold-blooded species, Argentine Tegus go into brumation, which is a hibernation-like state, during the seasons with cooler temperatures. During the warmer seasons, Tegus are very active.

Did you know?

Argentine Tegus have unusually high intelligence. It has been observed and recorded that some will regularly and clearly seek out human affection, just as a dog or cat might. Some form a strong attachment to their keeper. Some have been reported to come on command; they can also be house-broken.

 

Neon Tree Dragon

Neon Tree Dragon

Where in the world?

Tropical mountain jungles of southwest China and Tibet.

 

Animal Facts:

Neon Tree Dragons are an active and arboreal species, meaning that they spend a lot of time in trees. Their legs and toes are long and have sharp claws to help them climb. Their coloration is usually shades of brown or green with lighter or darker spots.

Male Neon Tree Dragons have black markings that take the form of a solid line running down their backs. On females, the markings are broken up into a series of diamond or square black shapes with green in between.

The average size of an adult Neon Tree Dragon is 10 – 12 inches, including the tail. These lizards feed mostly on insects, spiders and small vertebrates.

These lizards are part of the genus agama and are relatives of the Uromastyx and Bearded Dragon.

Did you know?

On a male, the black markings their back will take the form of an unbroken line running the length of their back; on the female it will be broken up into a series of diamonds or squares with green in between. Additionally, mature males will sport a small crest running from the back of their head and covering the back of their neck. They also have a larger dewlap.

 

Albino Burmese Python

Albino Burmese Python

Where in the world?

Tropical and subtropical habitats in Southeast Asia; invasive in southern Florida.

 

Animal Facts:

Albino Burmese Pythons are considered the second heaviest and fifth longest snake species. Females can weigh up to 400 pounds and measure 18 feet long.

Semi-aquatic snakes, Albino Burmese Pythons are excellent swimmers and can stay submerged up to 30 minutes. Younger, lighter individuals may spend some time in trees.

The female lays 12 to 36 eggs and will incubate them for 2 to 3 months until they hatch.

Did you know?

Albino Burmese Pythons are invasive in the Florida Everglades. Until recently, U.S. law prevented this and some other snake species from crossing state lines, despite the fact that these snakes could not survive anywhere else in the country.

Leopard Gecko

Leopard Gecko

Where in the world?

Dry grasslands and deserts of southwestern Asia.

 

Animal Facts:

Leopard Geckos eat a variety of invertebrates, and are specifically known to consume spiders, scorpions, centipedes and beetles.

These geckos can intentionally detach their tails, leaving the twitching tail to distract predators while the gecko escapes.

Unlike most other geckos, Leopard Geckos have eyelids and their toes have claws instead of sticky pads.

Did you know?

Leopard Geckos are named for their spotted pattern. However, these lizards stalk their prey like cats, even twitching their tail before striking!

Savannah Monitor

Savannah Monitor

Where in the world?

Sparse grasslands and seasonally dry areas of sub-Saharan Africa.

 

Animal Facts:

Savannah Monitors eat differently based upon their age and where they live. Young monitors eat arthropods as their primary food source, while adults eat more snails. They also eat slugs, amphibians, eggs, small mammals, reptiles and birds.

Male Savannah Monitors can reach up to 5 feet in length, however they typically average 2 – 2.5 feet.

The lifespan for these monitors in captivity can be as long as 15 years.

Did you know?

In some areas, Savannah Monitors prey on poisonous millipedes. Monitors will rub their chin on the millipede for up to 15 minutes before consuming it, perhaps to make the arthropod excrete most of its toxins.

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