Have you met a honey bear? That’s another name for a Kinkajou!

Have you met a honey bear? That’s another name for a Kinkajou!

The Kinkajou is also known as a “honey bear” because it sometimes raids bees nests. They are omnivores, which means that their food is primarily fruit with the rest consisting of leaves, flowers and insects.

Kinkajous are native to South and Central America and are related to raccoons and coatimundi. They don’t weigh too much, usually between three and ten pounds, however they can grow as long as twenty four inches, not including their tail.

A kinkajou’s tail can grow as long as their body! It is called a ‘prehensile’ tail. This type of tail is very strong and allows the Kinkajou to grasp and hold objects as it is finding and eating food in trees. These little guys have soft, woolly fur, really cute big eyes, and small ears.

Kinkajous are very friendly and they love to explore. You can now get up close and personal with Honey right here in Roseville, Minnesota!

For $19.95, plus the cost of admission for non-members, you can visit SeaQuest at the Rosedale Center to see, touch and feed a kinkajou today. Interaction times are at 11,1,3,5 and 7pm, for as many as five guests at each time. Book online at https://roseville.visitseaquest.com/kinkajou-encounter/.

SeaQuest also offers Kinkajou interactions in Layton, Utah, Las Vegas, Nevada, and Trumbull, Connecticut. Click the links below to book your Kinkajou interaction now!

Rescue Stories – Toothless the Axolotl

Toothless’ previous owners had been nursing him back to health after having rescued him from a tank where larger fish had bitten off his tail and parts of his limbs.  When they came to SeaQuest Littleton and saw the axolotl tank, they instantly knew that it would be his happiest home and best care for his recovery.

In March 2019 when Toothless moved in, most of his limbs and part of his tail had regrown.  While he still has some progress to make for a full recovery, Toothless loves visitors and will swim right up to the glass to see them.  He loves to eat earthworms and has plenty of room to swim, as well as a group of axolotl friends that he loves to snuggle up with!

SeaQuest is grateful to be actively involved in both preserving and saving the lives of many animals that would otherwise not survive in the wild, rehabilitating injured animals, and even acting as an exotic pet rescue for animals from homes where they have outgrown their habitats and need re-homing, such as parakeets, iguanas, pythons, and large fish.  If you have an animal that needs re-homing, contact your local SeaQuest and we will be happy to help give them a new home.

 

SeaQuest Folsom, California: (916) 673-9972

SeaQuest Littleton, Colorado: (303) 968-1340

SeaQuest Las Vegas, Nevada: (702) 906-1901

SeaQuest Fort Worth, Texas: (817) 731-5357

SeaQuest Layton, UT: (801) 544-4938

 

Rescue Stories – Loki the Sulcata Tortoise

Rescue Stories – Loki the Sulcata Tortoise

Loki was adopted by SeaQuest Folsom from the Arizona Herpetological Society in late 2018.  His previous owners were unable to provide him with the proper lighting and diet, which caused his shell to start mutating.  When the Arizona Herpetological Society took him in, the vet inserted piece of fiberglass in Loki’s shell to provide support to the affected portion of his shell and painted it red to signify the corrected area.

These days, Loki enjoys his home in the Egyptian Dessert where he has sod, reptile bark, and room to roam.  When he wants a break, he likes napping under his heaters and UVB lights or on his heating pad.  Our husbandry team ensures that he gets fresh water and a healthy diet consisting of grass hay, tortoise pellets, greens and veggies all day to cater to the sulcata’s grazing nature, as well as some fruit a couple times throughout week.

SeaQuest is grateful to be actively involved in both preserving and saving the lives of many animals that would otherwise not survive in the wild, rehabilitating injured animals, and even acting as an exotic pet rescue for animals from homes where they have outgrown their habitats and need re-homing, such as parakeets, iguanas, pythons, and large fish.  If you have an animal that needs re-homing, contact your local SeaQuest and we will be happy to help give them a new home.

 

SeaQuest Folsom, California: (916) 673-9972

SeaQuest Littleton, Colorado: (303) 968-1340

SeaQuest Las Vegas, Nevada: (702) 906-1901

SeaQuest Fort Worth, Texas: (817) 731-5357

SeaQuest Layton, UT: (801) 544-4938

 

Rescue Stories – Koka the Umbrella Cockatoo

Rescue Stories – Koka the Umbrella Cockatoo

While Cockatoos are an enjoyable companion, they can be messy, loud, and extremely time-consuming. Koka, an umbrella cockatoo, came to SeaQuest with an interesting background story.

Koka’s first owner was a hoarder and had to give her up because of the poor living conditions for the animals in her care. Koka was then adopted and bounced from one owner to the next because each owner did not realize the work they would need to put in to make this bird happy. Koka’s last owner had her for about two years before donating her to SeaQuest Utah so that Koka could have more stability in her life.

When Koka came to SeaQuest, she had plucked many of her feathers because of the stress from transitioning to so many homes. Upon arrival to SeaQuest, Koka was evaluated by a veterinarian and cared for by our expert bird husbandry team. That care included giving her a poncho that keeps Koka warm until her feathers grow back.

Koka now has consistent daily interactions, mental stimulation, and a proper diet that is needed to have a healthy and happy life. She was adopted by a bird husbandry team member and now visits SeaQuest and participates as a star in the daily bird shows.

 

SeaQuest is grateful to be actively involved in both preserving and saving the lives of many animals that would otherwise not survive in the wild, rehabilitating injured animals, and even acting as an exotic pet rescue for animals from homes where they have outgrown their habitats and need re-homing, such as parakeets, iguanas, pythons, and large fish.  If you have an animal that needs re-homing, contact your local SeaQuest and we will be happy to help give them a new home.

 

SeaQuest Folsom, California: (916) 673-9972

SeaQuest Littleton, Colorado: (303) 968-1340

SeaQuest Las Vegas, Nevada: (702) 906-1901

SeaQuest Fort Worth, Texas: (817) 731-5357

SeaQuest Layton, UT: (801) 544-4938

The votes are in for naming our American Mini Pigs!

The votes are in for naming our American Mini Pigs!

 

Squeak (black) and Squeal (gray) were born in early September 2018.  We’re so happy to have these two as part of our family here at SeaQuest!  Below are some fun facts about American Mini Pigs to tie you over until your visit to come see Squeak & Squeal.

The American Mini Pig was bred from a variety of pig breeds to attain its small stature and characteristic coloring.  The Minnesota Mini Pig was bred from a cross of Black Guinea Hogs, Feral Boars, the Piney Rooter, and the Ras-n-Lama pigs from Guam.  Eventually, the Minnesota Mini Pig was crossed with the Vietnamese Pot-bellied Pigs from Germany to attain the spotted appearance with the miniature pot-bellied body.

Adult mini pigs are around 15 to 20 inches from ground to the top of the shoulders.  Mini pigs have a friendly disposition and are very intelligent and trainable, making them a popular chose of pet for pig-lovers.

If you have called your dog a pig for eating too much, it would be an accurate description!  It’s rare for a pig to turn up its snout at food.  Pigs are opportunistic omnivores, eating anything from leaves, roots, and fruits to insects and fish.

Since the American Mini Pig is a label that covers any miniature pot-bellied pig, there are many nicknames.  Some of these nicknames include Teacup, Micro, Super Micro, Nano, Pixie, and Pocket Pig.

Why We Need Sharks

Why We Need Sharks

While the Great White Sharks makes the list as the third largest predators on Earth, not one out of over 400 species of sharks makes the list for the 10 most dangerous animals (citation HERE). Sharks are magnificent creatures that for years have had a bad reputation. We’re going to set the record straight and share some of the amazing things that sharks can do for us!

Balance the Ecosystems:

  • Oceans are the most important ecosystem on the plant. Sharks are the apex predator of the oceans – meaning they are at the top of the food chain. Their job is to keep marine life in a healthy balance.
  • Since sharks are at the top of the oceanic food chain, their absence could mean the end for many important fish, shellfish, and eventually, our precious coral reefs.
  • Sharks prevent other animals from overgrazing ocean grasses or overfeeding on smaller prey. Sharks also strengthen the gene pools of other animals by eating weak or diseased prey.

Innovation and Inspiration

  • For centuries, we have used shark teeth for weapons and inspiration for knives and other cutting tools.
  • Sharks are smooth and streamlined which has inspired inventors to make boats, submarines, and even airplanes more aerodynamic, mimicking the body of a shark.
  • Since barnacles and algae don’t grow on shark skin, it is inspiring developers to create more efficient ships that discourage barnacle and algae growth on marine vessels.
  • The electroreceptor organs that help sharks navigate the vast oceans could help human create technology to better navigate.

Research:

  • There’s a reason sharks rarely get sick – their immune system! By studying them, scientists could help prevent and cure diseases. There is even a chemical, squalamine, which is found in Dogfish that appears to kill bacterial microbes and remove potential tumor cells.
  • Sharks also have a special anticlotting compound found in their blood which could be helpful to researchers looking to prevent heart disease in humans.
  • Ever wanted shark eyes? Their corneas could eventually be a replacement for human eyes
  • There’s a reason you’ve never seen a shark sleeping – they swim while they sleep! Researchers hypothesize that by studying the brain of sharks, it could lead to the treatment of sleep disorders in human.

Sharks are so much more than just sharp teeth, they balance the ecosystem and inspire us in research and technology development. Do your part and protect our oceans and our sharks!

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